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Description

To Prepare

  • Review the Learning Resources on language and advocacy skills.
  • Click on the Walden University

    Advocacy in Practice

    media in the Learning Resources. View the video on the webpage, and select one advocacy example to analyze for this Assignment.
  • Research culturally appropriate terms used by professionals engaged in your advocacy topic.

Submit

a 2-page paper in which you:

  • Analyze the words spoken or written in the example you chose. Be sure to address the following: What is particularly effective or ineffective about the example? Consider tone, word choice, adjectives, labels, and potential bias. What might be the consequences in that example?
  • Apply lessons learned to the language of your advocacy project. How will you ensure that your advocacy project does not have negative consequences due to wording? How will you ensure bias-free language?

The attached transcript is a video but I can not attach the video. There are two examples in the transcript. The highlighted area is the example I chose.

The Language of Advocacy
The Language of Advocacy
Program Transcript
[MUSIC PLAYING]
FEMALE SPEAKER: No matter the type of advocacy they are pursuing and the people
with whom they’re working, advocates must be respectful and use bias-free language
that is culturally appropriate. They must also use language that inspires others and
accurately represents the social issue. This might mean researching the population to
determine appropriate labels and terms, summarizing information in an engaging way,
and avoiding judgment.
Let’s return to Susan, the HSPP creating an advocacy project. Susan is working on
inspiring respectful language in order to paint a picture of military families experiencing
domestic violence and the obstacles they face. She recalls two experiences she
witnessed earlier in her career as a new practitioner. Susan had been working at a
domestic violence resource center.
The center’s mission was to advocate for people who had experienced domestic
violence and connect them to appropriate services. One day, a woman entered the
center, and a colleague who responded to the woman in this way. Victims like you
normally prefer to complete a safety plan and file a restraining order.
If I were a victim, I would want to make sure that the batterer stays as far away from me
as possible. In response, the woman asked, but what about my children? The colleague
said, now, your children do need both parents, but battered spouses have to put their
children first.
After looking over the woman’s paperwork, the colleague continued. It seems that you
have been beaten before. That can really break a person down. Why didn’t you leave
earlier? The colleague sighed. Well, you are here now, so let’s see what we can do to
help.
The woman seemed to grow more withdrawn as the conversation continued. The
woman never returned to the center after this exchange. Only later did Susan realize
? 2021 Walden University, LLC
1
The Language of Advocacy
why. On another occasion, Susan’s colleague wrote an advocacy email to a human
services organization on behalf of a man who had experienced domestic violence. The
email read, “I am writing to you on behalf of Jason Hermosa, a victim of domestic
violence in his same sex relationship.
I know that you provide financial resources and support to battered wives and am
hoping this extends to homosexual couples. Jason is disabled and destitute, therefore
he is extremely reluctant to leave the financial comforts of his relationship, despite being
beaten and emotionally terrorized. Any assistance you can provide for this case would
be appreciated. Thank you for your time.”
A THOUGHT BUBBLE APPEARS WITH A QUOTE FROM SUSAN: ?What can I learn
about bias-free and culturally appropriate language from these examples??
[MUSIC PLAYING]
? 2021 Walden University, LLC
2
The Language of Advocacy
The Language of Advocacy
Program Transcript
[MUSIC PLAYING]
FEMALE SPEAKER: No matter the type of advocacy they are pursuing and the people
with whom they’re working, advocates must be respectful and use bias-free language
that is culturally appropriate. They must also use language that inspires others and
accurately represents the social issue. This might mean researching the population to
determine appropriate labels and terms, summarizing information in an engaging way,
and avoiding judgment.
Let’s return to Susan, the HSPP creating an advocacy project. Susan is working on
inspiring respectful language in order to paint a picture of military families experiencing
domestic violence and the obstacles they face. She recalls two experiences she
witnessed earlier in her career as a new practitioner. Susan had been working at a
domestic violence resource center.
The center’s mission was to advocate for people who had experienced domestic
violence and connect them to appropriate services. One day, a woman entered the
center, and a colleague who responded to the woman in this way. Victims like you
normally prefer to complete a safety plan and file a restraining order.
If I were a victim, I would want to make sure that the batterer stays as far away from me
as possible. In response, the woman asked, but what about my children? The colleague
said, now, your children do need both parents, but battered spouses have to put their
children first.
After looking over the woman’s paperwork, the colleague continued. It seems that you
have been beaten before. That can really break a person down. Why didn’t you leave
earlier? The colleague sighed. Well, you are here now, so let’s see what we can do to
help.
The woman seemed to grow more withdrawn as the conversation continued. The
woman never returned to the center after this exchange. Only later did Susan realize
? 2021 Walden University, LLC
1
The Language of Advocacy
why. On another occasion, Susan’s colleague wrote an advocacy email to a human
services organization on behalf of a man who had experienced domestic violence. The
email read, “I am writing to you on behalf of Jason Hermosa, a victim of domestic
violence in his same sex relationship.
I know that you provide financial resources and support to battered wives and am
hoping this extends to homosexual couples. Jason is disabled and destitute, therefore
he is extremely reluctant to leave the financial comforts of his relationship, despite being
beaten and emotionally terrorized. Any assistance you can provide for this case would
be appreciated. Thank you for your time.”
A THOUGHT BUBBLE APPEARS WITH A QUOTE FROM SUSAN: ?What can I learn
about bias-free and culturally appropriate language from these examples??
[MUSIC PLAYING]
? 2021 Walden University, LLC
2

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